joe rogan – Bastard Inc http://bastard-inc.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:43:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://bastard-inc.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png joe rogan – Bastard Inc http://bastard-inc.com/ 32 32 “Spotify makes artists uncomfortable” https://bastard-inc.com/spotify-makes-artists-uncomfortable/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 22:57:14 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/spotify-makes-artists-uncomfortable/ David Byrne says he thinks Spotify is “making artists uncomfortable” around the COVID misinformation scandal shared on Joe Rogan’s podcast. Earlier this year, Rogan and Spotify were heavily criticized for sharing misinformation about the coronavirus vaccine on the exclusive podcast The Joe Rogan Experiencewhich led to artists such as Neil Young and Joni Mitchell removing […]]]>

David Byrne says he thinks Spotify is “making artists uncomfortable” around the COVID misinformation scandal shared on Joe Rogan’s podcast.

Earlier this year, Rogan and Spotify were heavily criticized for sharing misinformation about the coronavirus vaccine on the exclusive podcast The Joe Rogan Experiencewhich led to artists such as Neil Young and Joni Mitchell removing their music from the service.

Byrne, who in 2013 publicly criticized the fact that ‘paltry’ artists are paid in terms of royalties from streaming services like Spotify, and claimed he had removed as much of his catalog as possible from the service, was questioned. on the ongoing scandal in a new interview with the Guardian.

“There’s been all these things on the platforms having… let’s say questionable or controversial content [and] spreading misinformation or outright lies or…not exactly hate speech, but things that make a lot of artists uncomfortable,” he said.

“And it’s pretty hard to do anything to help improve that unless you’re a Drake or Taylor Swift, or those kind of artists. It’s pretty hard for the rest of us to to have influence.

David Byrne performs at David Byrne’s ‘American Utopia’ Reopening Party at St. James Theater on October 17, 2021 in New York City. (Photo: Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images)

Byrne added: “A handful of mega, mega artists are doing very well, and many more – especially emerging artists – are struggling with it. There was definitely a time when I was like, “Oh, this is going to be tough for a lot of artists,” especially with Spotify’s “freemium” layer.

I watched Taylor Swift go to Apple and say, “You can’t do that; you can’t have a freemium layer that will last forever. And she – I mean, bless her heart – she managed to get them to [change their policy]. Which I think was brave for her and good for a lot of us.

Elsewhere, David Byrne and Mitski released a new collab called “This Is A Life” last week (March 8). The song is featured on the soundtrack of the new film A24, Everything everywhere all at once.

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How Spotify Quietly Supports the Military-Industrial Complex https://bastard-inc.com/how-spotify-quietly-supports-the-military-industrial-complex/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 16:39:00 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/how-spotify-quietly-supports-the-military-industrial-complex/ In the music streaming war, no one wins. Joe Rogan may have made many misleading, racist and transphobic comments on his podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience, but its language isn’t the only battle being waged on the audio streaming service. Unbeknownst to most users, Spotify has a secret business – supporting the military-industrial complex. In […]]]>

In the music streaming war, no one wins.

Joe Rogan may have made many misleading, racist and transphobic comments on his podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience, but its language isn’t the only battle being waged on the audio streaming service. Unbeknownst to most users, Spotify has a secret business – supporting the military-industrial complex.

In November 2021it was announced that investment firm Prima Materia, Spotify co-founder and CEO Daniel Ek has invested €100 millions of dollars (114 million) to Helsing, a Europe-based artificial intelligence company that helps military technology companies. Helsing’s AI technology would aid battlefield operations, helping to identify and evaluate multiple forms of data collected through sensors to piece together a picturesque view that military agents could then use at their discretion. .

Ek was eager to show off his red hands in the war machine, stating he was proud to close the deal, to partner with teams like Helsing. He also praised the company, saying the deal was, ambitious, ethical, & driven by a mission to help build a prosperous society.

Why would the CEO of a company whose goal was to provide instant access to music use his profits to fund war efforts? Although a report by Marie Charlotte Götting published on Statista indicates that in 2021, 73.2 % of Spotify revenue » primarily used to pay royalties to music rights holders and other fees,” payments to individual artists who don’t have big names are often miniscule. The scale of Ek’s investment in Helsing deeply narrows the artists operating within Spotify’s payment distribution model.

However, the support does not stop at direct investments. Spotify also hosts podcasts dealing with several elements of military affairs from history, strategy, and military technology. a podcast, Institute of Modern Warfaregave an eerily close-to-home discussion of the presence of AI, technology, and its human relationship to warfare in an episode last month titled The robotic revolution is already here. As the program tiptoed through the real-world elements of AI, an in-the-know listener might be able to pick up on some curious overlaps with Spotify’s real-world investments. This episode, produced by West Point, spoke of the AI ​​framework in its nuanced digital forms, connecting author August Cole’s vision of the future of trendlines in the context of the future of conflict, and the role that developing technologies such as software and robotics can play in relation to the possible future of warfare.

Imagine when we start applying these capabilities and technologies to things in the physical world,” said Cole, who co-authored Burn-In: A Novel of the Real Robotic Revolution. He continued with a discussion that invited the audience to wonder, what will be the role of the robot in the future of warfare.

Another podcast, titled From balloons to drones, actively discusses the development of military airfare power from the past to the present. Episode 21, aired in December, explained how drones are part of modern warfare. Michael J. Boyle, author of The Age of Drones: How Drone Technology Will Change War and Peace indicated on the program that, There is also a degree of intimacy in the sense that you know your target very well. You know who this person is. Drone pilots operate remotely but intimately with targets, which means they see them get up in the morning” and maybe say goodbye to their family. Boyle explains pilots connect” with targets to some extent because they observed them for long periods of time.

The fact that these particular podcasts are not only hosted on Spotify, but are also available on other music streaming platforms with their own connections to the war machine, is sobering. Discussing these topics while actually collaborating in these militaristic efforts through their investments is even worse.

However, the military sectors are regularly defended by the companies that support them. Both Amazon and Microsoft have reportedly received military contracts to help with drones. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos was adamant and proud of it, saying at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum in 2019, If big tech is going to turn its back on the Department of Defense, this country is in trouble, it just can’t happen.

Yet despite this news going unnoticed, some artists on the platform have spoken out against Spotify’s military relationship. On his Twitter, artist and DJ Darren Sangita wrote: It’s so vile. Music is NOT war! Just wrong on all levels. Sangita took his music off the platform when he learned of Ek’s investment and urged others to do the same. He even went so far as to encourage others who might join him to leave the stage. Sangita calls for peace and an end to Spotify’s involvement in arms companies. A few other artists followed suit after this announcement, including DJ Michail Stangl aka Opium Hum, DJ Justin Space and Gothtronica artist Saint Martyn.

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But even with increased awareness of Spotify’s actions, many artists still have their hands tied. Max Collins of rock band Eve 6 explained at length on Twitter that he was unable to avoid Spotify due to his contractual obligations with his record company, despite frustrations over Spotify’s ties to the military-industrial complex.

However, military connections to technology are not exclusive to these streaming giants. Someone choosing to buy from Tesla, for example, may overlook Tesla’s ties to military contracts and Taiwanese police fleets. Someone who orders groceries online through Amazon might not know that Amazon Web Services was awarded a hotly contested contract to help create an AI-driven solution. war cloud” of services for the US military. Someone searching Google (Alphabet, Google’s parent company, also owns Youtube) might not be aware of the company’s desire to work with the Pentagon on another form of warfare cloud technology, the Joint Warfighting Cloud Capability, or prior military contracts challenged by 3,100 Google employees. Anyone who might use Apple wearable technology might not know that the company has also contracted with the military to make wearable, expandable electronics for soldiers to wear.

These military ties that collide with so many products and services in our daily lives raise ethical conundrums. How are consumers supposed to operate within this framework? How do artists maintain their ethical integrity while continuing to make a living by reaching the right number of fans? It currently remains to be seen. Unlike doctors, these platforms have no moral duty towards their consumers or artists. Their top power is the almighty dollar.

Streaming platforms like Spotify, Apple, Amazon and Youtube don’t have any legal obligations to do business. They’re empowered in part because we didn’t insist on writing one for them. If we really want a future where our music is free from bombs and war, we need to think harder and push the platforms and companies that bring our streaming services to us. Only with compassionate and motivated consideration can we all dance together to a freer and more peaceful rhythm.

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Thinking of quitting Spotify? Here are some alternatives and how to transfer your music https://bastard-inc.com/thinking-of-quitting-spotify-here-are-some-alternatives-and-how-to-transfer-your-music/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 16:30:59 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/thinking-of-quitting-spotify-here-are-some-alternatives-and-how-to-transfer-your-music/ Spotify may be the world leader in music streaming, but its reputation has taken a hit in recent weeks due to Joe Rogan’s comments on vaccination and his history of insensitive comments. Now, with artists like Neil Young and Joni Mitchell pulling their music off the platform, subscribers are doing the same with their money. […]]]>

Spotify may be the world leader in music streaming, but its reputation has taken a hit in recent weeks due to Joe Rogan’s comments on vaccination and his history of insensitive comments. Now, with artists like Neil Young and Joni Mitchell pulling their music off the platform, subscribers are doing the same with their money.

Spotify and “The Joe Rogan Experience”

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Rogan is no stranger to controversy. The comedian, combat commentator and fear factor The host has been in hot water for years due to his penchant for questionable statements, racist remarks and platforming controversial figures. However, with the pandemic still raging and the continued push of Rogan pseudo-science, some people have had enough.

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Spotify vs YouTube Music – which is better for you? https://bastard-inc.com/spotify-vs-youtube-music-which-is-better-for-you/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 08:10:24 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/spotify-vs-youtube-music-which-is-better-for-you/ For many, when it comes to Spotify vs YouTube Music, Spotify is the one they gravitate towards. It’s become the first and last word in music streaming, but Google’s YouTube Music offers an intriguing alternative that’s quite distinct from the likes of Apple Music, Amazon Music and Tidal. So what makes YouTube Music different and […]]]>

For many, when it comes to Spotify vs YouTube Music, Spotify is the one they gravitate towards. It’s become the first and last word in music streaming, but Google’s YouTube Music offers an intriguing alternative that’s quite distinct from the likes of Apple Music, Amazon Music and Tidal.

So what makes YouTube Music different and how does it compare to market leader Spotify? Below is how the two compare on the metrics that matter.

Spotify vs. YouTube Music: Free Tier

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Kanye West is the latest to reject Spotify with the release of “Donda 2” https://bastard-inc.com/kanye-west-is-the-latest-to-reject-spotify-with-the-release-of-donda-2/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 19:00:58 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/kanye-west-is-the-latest-to-reject-spotify-with-the-release-of-donda-2/ Tell me if you’ve heard this one before: Ye, the artist formerly known as Kanye West (it was legally changed in October 2021. Show respect.) hasn’t posted 2 as it was supposed to on Tuesday, February 22 – just two days late with 16 songs streaming from the new album. 2however, is neither on a […]]]>

Tell me if you’ve heard this one before: Ye, the artist formerly known as Kanye West (it was legally changed in October 2021. Show respect.) hasn’t posted 2 as it was supposed to on Tuesday, February 22 – just two days late with 16 songs streaming from the new album. 2however, is neither on a typical streaming platform nor available in physical form.

Ye’s New Home

Just like the original donda, released in August, the hip-hop legend performed songs from the album live, this time appearing to walk on water back to his original childhood home before it burst into flames at LoanDepot Park, the home of the currently locked-out Florida Marlins in Miami. An addition and upgrade to the 2021 shows, when he appears to sold-out arenas at his childhood homes in Atlanta and Chicago, Kanye has also screened the show in IMAX theaters across the country. What’s more impactful, West has turned away from traditional platforms like Apple Music and Spotify to release 2.

Kanye West on the ‘Watch The Throne Tour’ with Jay-Z in Gelredome Arnhem, Netherlands. Pieter-Jannick Dijkstra/Flickr

Instead, eager fans are being asked to shell out $200 for Ye’s new venture, the Stem Player. The main benefit of the bloated MP3 player seems to be the ability to split songs into “stems”, giving users the ability to amp up drums, bass, vocals, and more. to develop different angles on the songs via various effects. What’s interesting is why Ye did this, other than to order another shipping container full of US currency.

“Today artists only get 12% of the money the industry makes. It’s time to free music from this oppressive system. It’s time to take control and build our own,” Ye wrote on Instagram on February 17.

This decision to reject Spotify highlights the current period of strife in a music industry that is constantly fracturing and redefining.

Low pay and quick response

According to Spotify’s Loud&Clear data, artists are paid between $0.0033 and $0.0054 each time their song is played on Spotify. In 2020, 13,400 artists generated over $50,000 and 7,800 generated over $100,000 in recording and publishing royalties. Musicians will receive a fraction of this amount. And these are just the most successful performers. Spotify cited around 1.2 million artists with over 1,000 listeners in 2020.

The average price per play on Apple Music is only gradually higher at $0.01. That’s why many artists, including Ye, Taylor Swift, David Crosby and Arcade Fire’s Will Butler, have been tackling different aspects of the music industry over the past few months. Swift, in fact, ran the gamut.

In 2014, Taylor Swift’s album 1989 did not appear on music streaming services. Shortly after the album’s release, she deleted her catalog as well. Less than a year later, however, Swift put her first four albums on Tidal, then Apple Music, on a promise of better pay. Little did she realize, however, that Apple would waive payment for streams during a free three-week trial period that everyone received. Defending her earning potential and supporting other artists, Swift asked Apple Music to change its stance and compensate musicians during her probationary period. Swift also switched to Spotify in 2017 for financial reasons. That didn’t mean she was done defending herself though.

In November, Taylor’s new recording Red (originally appearing in 2012) signaled his triumph over studio bosses, and one studio boss in particular – Scooter Braun. Taylor began her career at Big Machine Records. After already switching labels, Braun, a man Swift called a bully, bought Big Machine in 2019. The singer doesn’t own the music she recorded with Big Machine, so in fact Braun has always kept Swift’s music control. The songwriter Is knew the songs from her first six albums, so Swift decided on the best thing to do: re-record those albums.

The results of the first experiment, Red, were an unsurprising but still stunning success. The new album is now Swift’s 10th number one album on the Billboard 200 charts, nine years after its original release. As of November 27, a few weeks after release, a staggering 26 Red the songs sat on the Billboard Hot 100.

Where this quick and intentional action by the megastar motivated other music performers to rise up, the inspiration also came as a by-product of another star’s actions.

Related Guides

The unwitting example of Neil Young

Rock icon Neil Young’s rift with Spotify over hosting controversial podcaster Joe Rogan has sparked growing animosity over the streaming services’ low salaries.

The oft-quoted David Crosby, Young’s former bandmate, called Spotify execs “scummy people” at Stereogum and, to never miss an opportunity to cut ties, even advised young musicians to give up hope. and choose a new industry.

R&B singer India Arie was also tired of meager Spotify checks when Young took her music back to the California hills. She also criticized Rogan’s lyrics about race, so her decision to walk away felt justified even though she was giving up money. Leaving, however, provided Arie with the same challenges as Swift, as Motown owns most of his master recordings and refuses, at present, to take down the music.

For touring musicians who depend on live gigs to make money, these pandemic years have presented a disconcerting new economic picture where a paltry platform stream might be the only way to make money.

Spotify data indicates that only 13,400 artists generated over $50,000 and 7,800 generated over $100,000 in recording and publishing royalties in 2020. That’s out of 8 million artists on the platform that have released a total of 1.8 million albums and a total of 22 million tracks (including singles). That’s 0.15% of people on Spotify who actually make a living from the service.

The melodic note

Music is everywhere we go. Broadcast via loudspeakers on lazy Sundays. Coming from overhead at corner markets, grocery stores and big box stores. Overflowing from car windows and cafes. Stuffed in our ears on the way to work and at the gym. The ecosystem that streams music wherever we want it has been around for about three generations, evolving from payola to a monstrous empire before collapsing and growing again in the age of streaming. As has already been shown on the ever-changing ways of listening to music, there is no guarantee that tunes on demand will continue forever.

Artists like Ye are helping blaze new trails in the tech landscape. Enthusiasts might not want to shell out $200 for the Louis Vuitton Don’s new delivery system because it establishes new access to music. In order to support the former, music fans may need to open their wallets again to support a fragile ecology of the people who bring our harmonies.

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The Joe Rogan conundrum: For independent artists, what’s the cost of quitting Spotify? Musicians, managers, publishers weigh in on the boycott – Music https://bastard-inc.com/the-joe-rogan-conundrum-for-independent-artists-whats-the-cost-of-quitting-spotify-musicians-managers-publishers-weigh-in-on-the-boycott-music/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 04:10:40 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/the-joe-rogan-conundrum-for-independent-artists-whats-the-cost-of-quitting-spotify-musicians-managers-publishers-weigh-in-on-the-boycott-music/ Image by Zeke Barbaro/Getty Images For the sake of brevity, we’ll refer to the dilemma facing emerging artists facing doubts about the politics and finances of Spotify and music streaming in early 2022 as “The Joe Rogan Conundrum.” On the question of whether to unplug their music from the digital service, it is often a […]]]>

Image by Zeke Barbaro/Getty Images

For the sake of brevity, we’ll refer to the dilemma facing emerging artists facing doubts about the politics and finances of Spotify and music streaming in early 2022 as “The Joe Rogan Conundrum.”

On the question of whether to unplug their music from the digital service, it is often a question of whether a personal position is strong enough to outweigh the benefits of visibility and accessibility for potential fans of the whole world.

For jazz and rockabilly singer Jolie Goodnight, the question isn’t so much about the fractions of pennies she earns from streaming on the giant music streaming platform. Instead, it’s about whether her disagreement with the popular podcaster’s opinions is strong enough to push her away from a major resource to help build new fans.

“At the end of the day, my No. 1 priority is taking care of my fans, reaching new fans and being there for my audience,” said Goodnight, who leads his own jazz band and the band of rockabilly Jolie & the Jackalopes. “Does it make sense for me to stand firm in what I believe in? My current process is about what will hurt versus what will help, and what will jump on the bandwagon versus standing up for what you believe in .?

“I also don’t like the idea of ​​a platform like Spotify becoming a place with only a certain type of voice. I’d rather have my voice accessible wherever it’s needed.”

Welcome to the life of an independent musician in the age of streaming. The ideological self-test that sprung up in January when classic rocker Neil Young – and a parade of his peers – opted to pull their catalogs from Spotify over his support of controversial podcaster Rogan offered a moment’s look. in the mirror for young musicians, many of whom already consider the music streaming service a must-have to be considered a legitimate artist.

Artists and managers interviewed on the Rogan Conundrum told the the Chronicle that the questions they face revolve more around how all streaming services fit into the puzzle of building a career in a world where touring is still an uncertainty and physical album sales have largely dried up.

Louie Carr, manager of Austin blues artist Jackie Venson, said he had scaled back efforts in promoting Spotify in recent years, in part because of attempts to gain spots on playlists of service led to frustration. Carr recalled the waste of spending $6,000 on a campaign with a playlist promoter while working on Venson’s 2019 album, Joycalling the game a playground for predators and snake oil sellers.

Carr and Venson still view Spotify as a necessary resource that helps strengthen the bond forged with fans on other social media platforms.

The ideological self-test that sprung up in January when classic rocker Neil Young – and a parade of his peers – opted to pull their catalogs from Spotify over his support of controversial podcaster Rogan offered a moment’s look. in the mirror for young musicians, many of whom already consider the music streaming service a must-have to be considered a legitimate artist.

“Don’t worry about tapping into your moral compass and wondering if you’re doing the right thing trying to keep your 20,000 or 10,000 listeners happy. It’s not really a moral dilemma for us here since we trying here to survive in the most tumultuous time in the history of the music industry. In this time when everything is difficult, Spotify is also adding revenue.”

As for Young and other legacy artists’ decision to leave Spotify and gain prominence on competing platforms in the process, Carr sees it as a matter of haves and have-nots.

“It’s their privilege but it’s not ours. Good for them and I appreciate the position, but we haven’t changed the sound of a generation and sold millions of albums. They have the privilege of financial security as we spend three quarters of every dollar we make to create and sustain ourselves.”

Kevin Wommack, a veteran artist manager and music publisher who helped launch the careers of Texas rockers Los Lonely Boys, said none of the two dozen artists in his Traffic Music Group stable had explored pulling his music from Spotify, which is a reliable source of income. for most of its customers.

“We’ve had calls from people wanting to know what Los Lonely Boys are going to do, or wondering if this person or someone else is going to take a stand…We work for the artist, so if they want their stuff removed we would go through each of them and ask if they are going to be selfless with where they are in their careers, and do you need that $1,000 that is coming this month or is that money worth it for you to take a stand?”

Wommack said the outreach offered to artists who earn spots on high-profile playlists on Spotify can play a big role in furthering their careers, with the Texas Gentlemen among his acts currently featuring prominently on the chart. platform.

Even with the potential benefits offered by streaming services, Wommack said he hopes the attention Young’s position brings will lead to a broader debate about how Spotify and others compensate artists in general.

“The focus shouldn’t be on what a local artist should be doing there and whether they’re going to get on the so-called cool bus, but on the right thing for Spotify to do,” he said. he declares.

“Spotify is a technology company, not a music company. It’s not about breakthrough artists. To them, a Joe Rogan podcast is the same type of content as a new Rolling Stones single or a single from Sweet Spirit. They don’t care and it’s just content for their tech. They use their tech to make money for themselves.

For bluesy pop ballad Nakia Reynoso, Spotify hasn’t been a major part of the promotion plan for the release of all three versions of her new musical’s music, piano duellargely because of his objections to how the platform uses its ownership deals with major label partners to create deals that result in low compensation for musicians.

Acknowledging that “there are a lot of people like Joe Rogan, and that’s not going to change,” Reynoso echoed Wommack in hopes that the scrutiny Spotify and other streamers are currently facing could lead to a bigger change.

“The good thing about Neil and Joni and all the people of this generation of protest is that they have the credibility to make a story out of it and just need other people to support them. At this point, this would be something Spotify should pay some attention to, and they’re already hammered on it.There’s never been a better time than now to say this stuff isn’t fair.

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Spotify and streaming installments: Thirty Tigers Head dissects the problem https://bastard-inc.com/spotify-and-streaming-installments-thirty-tigers-head-dissects-the-problem/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 18:24:01 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/spotify-and-streaming-installments-thirty-tigers-head-dissects-the-problem/ In the two weeks since Neil Young announced he would be leaving Spotify over concerns over Joe Rogan’s Covid misinformation, conversations about the corporate streaming giant have erupted in the industry. the music. While many, like India Arie and Joni Mitchell, have kept up the pressure on Rogan, who has a $100 million contract with […]]]>

In the two weeks since Neil Young announced he would be leaving Spotify over concerns over Joe Rogan’s Covid misinformation, conversations about the corporate streaming giant have erupted in the industry. the music. While many, like India Arie and Joni Mitchell, have kept up the pressure on Rogan, who has a $100 million contract with the company, others, from Rosanne Cash at Sadie Dupuistook the opportunity to open up broader conversations about Spotify’s payment structures, artist rights, and the broader streaming economy.

Amid these conversations, David Macias, the owner and co-founder of Nashville-based label services company Thirty Tigers, has become frustrated with what he sees as a lopsided conversation casting Spotify as the scapegoat of the sole giant. infamous music. industry. From Macias advantageous position — as the head of an independent music company that has succeeded in the age of streaming — the conversation around royalty payments and streaming is much more nuanced. He spoke with rolling stone about his company’s payment structures and how Spotify has benefited his roster of artists over the years.

Overall, at Thirty Tigers, the general rule is that our artists earn 75% of gross proceeds. We share the remaining 25% with The Orchard, which is our distributor. Last year, last year, we made $36 million in revenue, and the 10-12% we keep is how we compensate our staff of 27 people. We go out there and act like a label would on behalf of an artist, but we allow artists to retain ownership of their work. The artists are their own labels. We are their loving background staff.

Any expenses or advances come from the 75% the artist earns, but since this is their own label, there are a lot of ancillary revenues that can go to the artists – merchandise on the road, film or television placement – that come back directly. .

It has become more difficult to earn a living as an artist. Anyone who tries has my deepest respect. If an artist streams a million times, they should get around $4,000. And while it seems like a million streams is a ton, last month 45 of our nearly 100 artists streamed a million times across all streaming platforms, some considerably more than that.

So it pains me when I see artists and those who love them misdiagnose the source of their difficulty. Spotify is the current scapegoat for the working-class artist’s ills, despite giving 63% of its gross revenue back to rightsholders.

Democratization has been a huge boon for independent artists in that it has given more artists a chance, but it hasn’t been enough to earn them a living wage. The cake is sliced ​​so thinly that most performers go hungry. In 2021, 60,000 songs were uploaded to Spotify every day.

So how can artists make enough money to survive? There are options for a sponsorship model like Patreon that can work outside of pre-recorded music revenue models. But what I don’t want to see happen is artists misattributing the source of their problem and undermining the DSPs that have played a huge role in democratizing indie music.

Is Spotify perfect? Far from there. I won’t touch on the Joe Rogan issue. This is a matter of conscience for artists and their advocates. Do I wish Spotify wasn’t join other DSPs to appeal the Copyright Royalty Board’s decision to pay publishers and songwriters 15% of revenue? Absoutely. When the artists I work with walk into their offices in New York, more often than not I hear about the opulence of their offices and the perks that are available to their full-screen employees.

A painful question must be asked at this point: is it the right of an artist to live from his art in a capitalist market? In a country where the business failure rate is 65% over ten years, should artists be safe from business failure? As much as my heart goes out to anyone who is unable to achieve their dream, I would say that answer is no.

Disparagement is easy. I heard it’s not the people, it’s the system that’s broken. To that, I counter that any system that has increased parity and overall income is not a failing system. There’s just much, much more music available, and while the pie is getting bigger, it’s unable to feed everyone. Artists need to understand the reality of the situation and have their eyes clear on the battles they have to fight. My contention is that dismantling the existing system without replacement will hurt independent artists.

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What the Neil Young-Spotify moment teaches us | News, Sports, Jobs https://bastard-inc.com/what-the-neil-young-spotify-moment-teaches-us-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 08:49:01 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/what-the-neil-young-spotify-moment-teaches-us-news-sports-jobs/ The rift between popular podcaster Joe Rogan and aging rocker Neil Young provided one of those times when late-night comics wake up and joke writers start doodling. Two counterculture icons representing very different demographics – one a Grammy-winning entertainer and the other a former TV host. “Fear Factor” and Ultimate Fighting Championship commentator […]]]>

The rift between popular podcaster Joe Rogan and aging rocker Neil Young provided one of those times when late-night comics wake up and joke writers start doodling.

Two counterculture icons representing very different demographics – one a Grammy-winning entertainer and the other a former TV host. “Fear Factor” and Ultimate Fighting Championship commentator — clashed, of all things, COVID-19 and the vaccine debate.

Young is pro-science, basically, and Rogan is pro-Rogan. Because Rogan is spreading covid misinformation, Young pulled his catalog of songs from Spotify, which carries them both, and wrote online: “They can have Rogan or Young. Not both.”

Just so you know, I immediately sided with Young because I agree with his principled position, but mainly because: “Cowgirl in the sand.”

Now that other musicians have also pulled their music from Spotify in solidarity with Young, the joke has gotten a bit more serious. Another personal favorite, Joni Mitchell, pulled his music from Spotify, as did Nils Lofgren, who is a member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band.

Needless to say, Rogan isn’t going anywhere and Spotify has done some PR – well, let’s call them tweaks. Now, when Rogan talks about COVID, Spotify will offer some kind of warning label. And Rogan says he will try to be more balanced in the future. It surely helps that Rogan recently signed a deal with Spotify for $100 million. It’s all about the money, you see.

As his fans shrug and say, so what, Rogan must be beaming. Contrition does not suit him. People who have never heard of Rogan before are probably tuned in; people who already loved it don’t lose sleep over the music they probably don’t listen to. Fans listen to his candid talk and jokes and may or may not infer much from his COVID rants.

Diatribes are not (yet) against the law. And, anyway, listeners wouldn’t necessarily change their minds based on a comic’s opinion on something as serious as a pandemic. To the right?

He’s entertainment – the way Rush Limbaugh was, and Dan Bongino and Tucker Carlson are today. Remember that FOX News’ own lawyers successfully defended Carlson against defamation charges by essentially saying the anchor doesn’t deal “real facts” and that viewers shouldn’t take it seriously.

What a catch! The same could be said of Rogan, who at least does not pretend to be a journalist. (Carlson was once a journalist and no one knows where this guy went.)

I love a noble position as much as the next Irish girl and I appreciate the one Young and her ilk have taken. But the Rogan/Young case raises important questions that will stick with us as long as free speech exists. Should opinions be censored – ever? Whatever happened, as Mitchell said, to “Both sides now?”

We generally honor the familiar exception: you can’t shout “Fire” in a crowded theater (for no reason) because people might panic, rush in and get crushed to death. The risk of disastrous consequences is considered greater than the right to say anything, anytime, anywhere.

But what if you spread misinformation during a pandemic that could possibly put people’s lives at risk? Aren’t these two scenarios comparable? And if not, what should be done to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of misinformation?

Great question, KP. No idea. Probably nothing. To take a position. Make noise. Be a better messenger. Listen to Young and Mitchell and stop Rogan.

In a more perfect world, there would be only one set of objective facts and one message for achieving the best possible health outcomes. But we have become a nation of conspirators and disbelievers. We are in a global information war across multiple media platforms and the winners often seem to be those who feed superstition and starve truth.

Bottom line: Rogan is free to voice his beliefs and interview whomever he wants, like infectious disease specialist Robert Malone, who shares his skepticism. If a virologist who worked on the technology used in Pfizer and Moderna vaccines a long time ago, like Malone did, has doubts, why wouldn’t people be interested in hearing what he has to say? ? There are reasons, but none that would prohibit his speech.

Moreover, when people have determined that they cannot trust the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or our country’s designated expert, Anthony Fauci, we are in uncharted territory. Luckily, not all of us are comedians willing to risk lives for laughs. But you risk everything when you start controlling what you have the right to say in the village square.

If what Shakespeare wrote was right and the “the truth will come out” we can only hope he hurries up and shows his face.

Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.



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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle could surprisingly benefit from Spotify misinformation scandal, expert speculates https://bastard-inc.com/prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-could-surprisingly-benefit-from-spotify-misinformation-scandal-expert-speculates/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 02:06:15 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-could-surprisingly-benefit-from-spotify-misinformation-scandal-expert-speculates/ Streaming giant Spotify has been embroiled in a scandal after being accused of allowing misinformation to spread on its platform. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle currently have a deal to create content for Spotify, and according to a royal expert, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex could benefit from the controversy. Meghan Markle and Prince […]]]>

Streaming giant Spotify has been embroiled in a scandal after being accused of allowing misinformation to spread on its platform. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle currently have a deal to create content for Spotify, and according to a royal expert, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex could benefit from the controversy.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry | Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

What happened with Spotify?

At the end of January, musicians such as Neil Young and Joni Mitchell announced that they wanted to remove their music from Spotify.

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Exclusive: Spotify Report Wanted by NYC Pensions Official https://bastard-inc.com/exclusive-spotify-report-wanted-by-nyc-pensions-official/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 12:16:00 +0000 https://bastard-inc.com/exclusive-spotify-report-wanted-by-nyc-pensions-official/ A trader is reflected on a computer screen displaying the Spotify brand before the company begins selling as a direct listing on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York, U.S., April 3, 2018. REUTERS /Lucas Jackson Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register Feb 7 (Reuters) – New York […]]]>

A trader is reflected on a computer screen displaying the Spotify brand before the company begins selling as a direct listing on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York, U.S., April 3, 2018. REUTERS /Lucas Jackson

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Feb 7 (Reuters) – New York state’s top pensions official has asked streaming music platform Spotify Technology SA (SPOT.N) for details on the effectiveness of its new content rules, citing complaints including that podcaster Joe Rogan spread misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines.

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, who oversees funds holding Spotify shares, requested the report in a letter sent to Spotify chief executive Daniel Ek on February 2, which was shown to Reuters.

The letter also urged Spotify to give users a simple mechanism to report content that may violate its rules and to outline how its board oversees content risk and enforcement.

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DiNapoli cited reports of Spotify hosting content that included COVID-19 misinformation and racist and anti-Semitic material. Last month, prominent rock musician Neil Young left the platform last month because he said Rogan misled people about vaccines, followed by other stars. Read more

“As we have seen with other technology and media companies that host or publish content, failure to successfully moderate content on a company’s platforms can lead to a variety of reputational, regulatory, legal and and financial,” DiNapoli wrote.

Spotify representatives did not respond to requests for comment.

Rogan, a former reality TV show Fear Factor host and mixed martial arts commentator who signed a $100 million deal giving Spotify exclusive rights to his podcast, promised more balance on his show . The company said it would add a content notice to any episode with COVID discussion in an attempt to quell the controversy.

On January 30, Spotify also announced “platform rules” against things like “content that incites violence or hatred towards a person or group of people based on race, religion, ‘gender identity or expression’, and other areas.

Pension funds overseen by DiNapoli held Spotify shares worth $41 million as of December 31, only the 73rd-largest stake in the company.

But DiNapoli is among a group of influential activists who have successfully lobbied for greater content scrutiny at other social media companies. Read more

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Reporting by Ross Kerber; Editing by David Gregorio

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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